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News - 6 June 2014

Care changes may mean thousands lose out.

 New legislation which will be introduced in April 2015, will see all local authorities in England use the same minimum guidelines for determining whether they should provide care or not.

 
The regulations, which are subject to consultation, set out the care needs someone must have to qualify for council-funded care.
 
Councils currently fund care at one of four levels - low, moderate, substantial or critical.
The proposed criteria are similar to the "substantial" category that most councils currently use.
 
Lavinia Newman, founder of ABDS comments:
“In a publication last year by The Department of Health, it found 130 of the 152 councils who provide care, did so at the substantial level. Only three councils paid at the higher critical level, and ministers expect about 4,000 extra people living in those areas to become eligible for help, as the rules would be eased. But in 19 council areas, which currently pay for moderate or low needs, there are fears the amount of care provided will be reduced, because the criteria will become stricter.”
 
The Care and Support Alliance said it was concerned the proposals "hardwire in the status quo of highly rationed care rather than create a preventative system that lives up to their big ambitions and keeps people from being isolated and ending up in A&E".
 
Caroline Abrahams, charity director at Age UK, welcomed a "standardised" system, but said the new regulations were "restrictive" and "not good enough".
 
Richard Hawkes, chairman of the Care and Support Alliance - a coalition of 75 organisations representing older and disabled people and their carers, said: "The government has passed up the chance to drive through a genuinely preventative system.
 
Rachael Byrne, executive director of care and support for Home Group, one of the UK's largest providers of social care services, said: "Many people who have relied on care from their local council will find themselves squeezed out. This will place an intolerable strain on an already overstretched NHS.
 
The consultation is open until 15 August and centres on the changes that will come into effect from April 2015.
 
Changes set to be introduced in 2016 include a cap on personal care costs of £72,000, excluding accommodation, and a new requirement on councils to provide preventative services.
 
If you need any help and advice on Care Homes and Nursing Homes, contact Peter Ham, Lavinia Newman, Stuart Coleman or Tonmoy Kumar to discuss how ABDS can help
 
ABDS Chartered Certified Accountants of Southampton.
Tel: 023 8083 6900 E-mail: abds@netaccountants.net
 
Brilliant with numbers  
Great with people  
Clear and precise with advice
Timely and cost effective
In touch with issues that face our clients
Mindful of our client’s long term strategic goals
 
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