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News - 20 February 2015

Delayed school entry linked with poorer results

A delay in starting school for summer-born or premature children may be linked with poor academic performance later on, a study suggests.

Some experts believe delayed school entry benefits this group of children.

However, the study found children who missed a year of learning often did worse in tests at the age of eight.

Liz Kennett, Audit and Accounts Manager of ABDS, and a Schools and Charities specialist comments:
“The research team, led by scientists at Warwick University, analysed the records of 999 children, of whom 472 were born before their due dates, born in the German state of Bavaria in 1985 and 1986. The researchers looked at teachers' assessments of the children's achievements in their first year of school and compared these with results of standardised maths, reading, writing and attention tests when the children were eight.”

At the time the data was collected, children in Bavaria were assessed for school-readiness by a community paediatrician in the year before they were due to start school at six.

This meant the researchers were able to compare the school records of children who started at the expected age with those whose entry was held back a year.

The records reveal no difference between the two groups of children in teacher assessments in their first year of school.

But both groups took the standardised tests at the age of eight whether they had started school aged six or a year later, and the results showed the children who started later than their peers did worse.

Dr Julia Jaekel, of the Ruhr University Bochum department of developmental psychology, said many parents of preterm children believed delaying school entry would be more beneficial.
"However, we found missing one year of learning opportunities was associated with poorer average performance in standardised tests at eight years of age for both preterm and full-term children.

The researchers drew on data from the Bavarian Longitudinal Study, which followed children born in the state in the mid-1980s.

The research is published in the Journal of Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.

If you need any help and advice with Free School or Academy Schools, contact Lavinia Newman or Peter Ham now to discuss how ABDS can help bring their experience to these

ABDS Chartered Certified Accountants of Southampton.
Tel: 023 8083 6900  E-mail: abds@netaccountants.net

Brilliant with numbers   
Great with people  
Clear and precise with advice
Timely and cost effective 
In touch with issues that face our clients and
mindful of their long term strategic goals

Helping Your Business is Our Business

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