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News - 6 March 2015

Problems for schools expected with changes to the exam system.

The National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) says it fears that the changes to the exam system, due to come into force in six months’ time, will leave students unsure which exams and subjects to take.

The government hopes to make A-levels and GCSEs in England more rigorous, basing the new system on the achievement levels found in areas such as Singapore, Korea and Hong Kong.

This will mean the biggest shake-up of the exams system in three decades.

NAHT general secretary Russell Hobby said: "We face an extended period of volatility. "The cause of this volatility is the sheer scale and speed of changes to the examination system - changes to both the scoring of the exams themselves, and to the way these scores are used to judge the performance of schools."

Association of School and College Leaders general secretary Brian Lightman said: "School and college leaders are deeply unhappy about the way in which a large number of changes to exams have been introduced in a short space of time in a piecemeal manner.

Liz Kennett, Audit and Accounts Manager of ABDS, and a Schools and Charities specialist comments:
“The biggest change introduced in the autumn term 2015 will be at AS-level. Currently taught in the first year of sixth form, the qualification will no longer count towards the final A-level result in many, but initially not all, subjects.  At GCSE, English and maths will become more challenging. Topics such as calculus, differentiation and kinematics, previously taught to 17-year-olds will now be introduced to 15-year-olds.”

Teachers have dubbed the new course "big maths" because there is so much more content. Some schools have estimated they will need an extra hour each week to teach it.

A Department for Education spokesperson said: "As part of our plan for education we have made important reforms to our exam system to ensure young people leave school ready to succeed in life in modern Britain.”

If you need any help and advice with Free Schools, Academy Schools or Charities, contact Lavinia Newman, Peter Ham or Liz Kennett now to discuss how ABDS can help bring their experience to these matters.

ABDS Chartered Certified Accountants of Southampton.
Tel: 023 8083 6900  E-mail: abds@netaccountants.net

Brilliant with numbers   
Great with people  
Clear and precise with advice
Timely and cost effective 
In touch with issues that face our clients and
mindful of their long term strategic goals

Helping Your Business is Our Business

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